Posts Tagged ‘Scissor practice’

Happy Valentine’s Day from Cheerful Learning!

In honor of tomorrow’s holiday, why not try out some fun, heart-themed activities with your little ones?

For example, how fun are those paper plate hats? I got the idea from here, and we just happened to have some pink paper plates left over from Remi’s recent princess birthday party, so we were ready to go! (Only have white plates? No problem! Just hand your preschooler some crayons, markers, or paints, and let her go to town decorating the hat herself!)

I drew the pattern on the plate and let Remi cut it out herself. This was her first time using scissors on something other than plain paper, and it was challenging for her little hands, but she did the best she could and I took over to help out right at the end.

Anything to work those hand muscles is good preparation for all the writing she has ahead of her in future school grades. One of my favorite things to do with Remi is taking her to the bathroom mirror to look at her creations. I always enjoy the response!

We also did several fun, heart-themed math activities. (I got all the free printables from here, and you can, too!)

We started out with a Count-and-Sort activity. I gave her a box of candy conversation hearts…you know, the ones that taste like chalk? 😉 She arranged them by color on the sorting mat, then counted how many of each color she had. We talked about more, less, most, least, and fewest as she answered questions about each.

Next up was a Heart Graphing activity.

Remi looked at the color words at the bottom of the graph, and added the hearts where appropriate. Then we looked at the graph together and I had her compare the stacks. (Which has more—green, or purple? Do any of them the same amount?)

If your preschooler is like mine, she loves any activity involving do-a-dot markers, so why not try a game of Heart Bingo?

I wrote numerals on each heart and then gave her a die, and each time she rolled it she had to count the pips (dots on the die) and stamp that numeral. She did this over and over and over!

The mistake I made? There were eight hearts, so without thinking I numbered them one through eight. Well, as you know, there are only six sides of a die, and she quickly noticed that she was never going to get a seven or eight. She asked if she could go ahead and stamp them anyway, and I let her—after identifying each and counting aloud for me.

By the way, this is a great time to teach your child that two are DICE and one is a DIE.

While the die was out, we used it to play a Valentine’s Grid Game.

I gave her some red Unifix cubes and told her they were bear candy. The grid contained bears with hearts, and those bears were VERY hungry for some Valentine’s candy. But, the only was they could get some was for her to roll the die, count the pips, and give that number of bears one piece of “candy” each. She was very concerned about the poor, hungry bears, and worked quickly to make sure each one had a treat!

In the meantime, she was getting some good practice identifying those dot patterns…but don’t tell her that, OK?

The great thing about all these activities is that, once you get your preschooler started, she can work fairly independently if you need to teach older children, nurse a baby, etc. Just stay close enough to enjoy watching the fun she’s having!

We brought the conversation hearts back out for some Heart Patterning work.

The worksheets I used were from a set of eight pages (see link above) and contained AB, ABC, AABB, and AAB patterns. Unfortunately, our box of candy didn’t contain all the colors we needed, so we just did the ones we could and a few times I substituted for her by, for example, covering yellow hearts with green candy ones to change the pattern to something we could do with the hearts we had. And, finally, she got to eat some hearts as a reward for all her hard “work” (play) doing math! 🙂

Finally, we did a fun Valentine’s Maze. I explained to my daughter that this little man loved this little woman, and really wanted to give her some flowers for Valentine’s Day, but he was having a hard time finding her. Remi was all too happy to help him out!

I found the maze at this site, which also contains other preschool printables like dot-to-dots, as well as lots of fun activities for your older kids, too. I printed out several Valentine’s Day activities from there for my ten year old, including word searches, word scrambles, and crypto-families.

Make the most of this special day with your little one. By next Valentine’s Day, she’ll be so much more grown up!

From our family to yours, Happy Valentine’s Day.

Enjoy learning together!

 

(Please note that this post contains affiliate links. You can read my disclosure here.)

We are HUGE Dr. Seuss fans around here, so it’s no surprise that one of our favorite Christmas books is How the Grinch Stole Christmas!

(You can see that our family’s copy is well loved…)

Remi has asked me to read it to her over and over during the last several weeks, and lately we’ve been enjoying some fun activities to go along with the book. Here are some of the things we did, in case you want to enjoy them, too:

Art:

I found a Grinch mask at the Dr. Seuss website and let her paint it a nice, grinchy green.

We then cut it out, punched holes together, and added some green yarn to make a mask for her to wear as she ran all over the house trying to scare her siblings.

Snack:

We stirred up some Grinch Juice by adding food coloring to a glass of milk. It was a good time to review the way two colors (like blue and yellow) can mix together to make a third (like grinchy green).

Grinch Juice

Grinch Juice

I had to laugh because she was really excited about it until she tasted it…

…and then, even though she had helped mix it up and knew there was nothing in it but milk and food coloring, she declared that it tasted “disgusting.”

However, when we added it to a bowl of cereal for a grinchy snack, she loved it.

Grinch snack

Grinch snack

Just for fun:

We happen to have a stuffed version of Max, or as Remi calls him, “the Grinch’s poor, poor puppy dog” (which he turned into a phony reindeer in the book.)

We pulled him out along with our Christmas decorations and Remi has had a blast playing with him for weeks now.

Craft:

Also on the Seuss website, I found a template for some ornaments starring poor Max.

Remi colored them…all blue (?)…

…using her tongue, too, of course.

I laminated them and then Remi got some fun scissor practice cutting the shapes out.

We punched holes in the top of each picture so we could make them into ornaments. Remi LOVES using a hole punch but her little hands just aren’t strong enough to do it on her own. So, I let her put her hands on top of mine and I tell her to push really hard…and together we manage very well. 😉

I offered her a choice of red or green yarn for the hangers. She chose both. Here’s her finished product:

Silly Activity:

Remember the crazy hair the Whoville residents wore in the non-animated version of the movie?  Well, we decided to fix Remi’s hair up like little Cindy Lou Who’s was so that she could be Remi Lou Who. I loved the result!

Remi Lou Who

Remi Lou Who

This was very entertaining for Remi, too. I took her into the bathroom to let her check her new look out in the mirror, and she laughed so hard! She stayed there a long time cracking up at her reflection, then wore her hair that way the rest of the morning.

More arts & crafts:

Finally, I printed a picture of the Grinch’s face from here.

Remi painted it with red and green and added some cotton for his hat.

(Aren’t you glad you saw the “before” picture so you know what you’re looking at? My original intention was for her to color it with crayons, but hey…once the paint is out, it will always be the first pick.)

We also did a fun Grinch maze.

Of course, this book also provides a great opportunity to discuss what the Grinch learns at the end of the book: Joy isn’t found in THINGS!

I hope you enjoy reading How the Grinch Stole Christmas! to your little one this holiday season.

Enjoy learning together!