Posts Tagged ‘preschool math’

This week at Cheerful Learning Preschool we’ve been knee deep into learning about our great country in honor of our very special, very important Independence Day holiday. Don’t let anyone tell you that preschoolers can’t understand and remember all kinds of information about the Statue of Liberty, Mount Rushmore, the Liberty Bell, the White House, and many other famous landmarks and patriotic concepts.

Having said that, we never want to get so wrapped up in the facts that we forget to have some big fun doing those “just because” crafts and activities. Here are just a few of the things we did this week to celebrate and learn about the USA:

Mostly, we focused on recreating the American flag, starting with this adorable handprint version I found here.

handprint flag

We pressed her painted hand onto black construction paper (so the white would show up) and she used her finger, dipped in white paint, to create the “stars.”

handprint flag

We did some fun patterning activities for math with these fireworks pattern strips and cards. I downloaded them from here and printed on cardstock. We gave names to each type of firework so she could say the patterns out loud as she worked.

preschool patterns--fireworks

If your preschooler loves to use a paper punch as much as mine does, he’ll love making his own stars for a USA flag craft like the one below:

preschool USA flag

preschool USA flag

preschool USA flagDon’t you just love the finished product? Adorable! (This activity was very loosely based on this idea.)

We did tons of activities downloaded from this website, including shadow matching, find the difference, what comes next, matching, tracing and other pre-writing activities, and lots and lots of these fun puzzles:

USA puzzles for preschoolers

For movement, I printed off a whole set of fun little action cards like the ones below from here. (I printed several cute, patriotic songs while I was there, too,!)

4th of July action cards

In the end, though, it was right back to our Grand Old Flag. We still love do-a-dot marker activities, so had to add in this project. (I found it here.)

do-a-dot flag

do-a-dot flagWhatever you and your preschooler do to celebrate and learn about this important holiday, I hope that you….

Enjoy learning together!

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I realize it’s been a while since I’ve posted what we’ve been doing around here, and if you’re curios about why, you can check out this post. If you just want to jump into a fun, book-related activity, you are in the right place!

(Please note that this post contains affiliate links. You can read my disclosure here.)

A while back Remi and I enjoyed a silly, hands-on unit centered around another of Dr. Seuss’ genius works, One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish. Here’s what we did, and how you can do it all, too:

Of course, the first thing we did was read the book together.

And though we’ve read this one a thousand times before, Remi never seems to grow tired of hearing it…or any other Seuss books, for that matter.

Then we got started on our projects.

First up was some math fun. We did some Goldfish Graphing using a free printable from here and some colored Goldfish crackers.

Remi had fun lining up the fish, and then counting to see how many there were of each color.

We also used our Goldfish crackers to do some number matching. She had to look at the number on each fishbowl and figure out how many fish to place inside the bowl.

Each time she found a broken one, she pointed out that she really couldn’t count with it, and asked if she should eat it instead.

You can get the free printable below right here.

For our first snack, we made some blue Jell-O to represent the water, and when it started to gel we added some Swedish Fish candy. I found the idea here, and trust me when I say it was a BIG hit.

Then, after looking through the book at all the zany creatures Dr. Seuss came up with, I asked Remi to create some crazy creatures of her own. I gave her some different colors of Play-Doh, a container of plastic beads, and a big bag of colored feathers, and let her go to town doing whatever she wanted with them. (You could use any craft materials you like for this activity.)

These are the creatures Remi came up with: (Hey, she was only three…)

I got the idea for making the creatures from this post, and there is a lot you can do with this activity. Just shaping the Play-Doh and pushing in the 3-D elements is a great fine-motor activity, plus you can add in some language enrichment by having her tell you about each creature. What is the creature’s name? What does it do? What does it eat? 

Before our next snack, we looked back at the pages that talk about the Yink who likes to wink and drink pink ink. I put some pink ink in a little glass for Remi…well, OK, it was really just strawberry milk, but hey—we’re using our imaginations here! I got the pink ink idea here and then I added a straw and pompom to make it extra fun.

Of course, as she was drinking her pink ink, Remi practiced winking, too.

We did these activities months ago, but she still asks me if we can drink pink ink again…and that, to me, is the measure of success! Such simple things can make big impressions on preschoolers, so use your imagination and try some silly things that they’ll remember forever! (And don’t forget to take some pictures to jog those memories, for both of you.)

For our final project, we made a handprint craft to represent the book’s title. I painted Remi’s hands—one red, one blue, of course. This was just as much fun as the craft itself!

Then I had her stamp them on a piece of sturdy white paper and I labeled them for her. (I got the handprint idea from here.)

I cut the paper into the shape of a fishbowl and Remi used a black marker to add faces to the fish once the paint was dry. Then, I poured some light corn syrup into a small container for her and let her squeeze in a few drops of blue food coloring. We mixed it up and she used a paintbrush to spread it all over the fishbowl to make it look like it was full of water. (No worries if your child licks this “paint” off her fingers, either!)

The end result not only looked great; it felt great, too! It wasn’t sticky, exactly, but nice and squishy when pressed on with my…um, I mean, her…fingers (after we let it dry overnight, of course).

I hope you enjoy these One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish activities with your preschooler. I’d love your feedback.

Enjoy learning together!

Happy Valentine’s Day from Cheerful Learning!

In honor of tomorrow’s holiday, why not try out some fun, heart-themed activities with your little ones?

For example, how fun are those paper plate hats? I got the idea from here, and we just happened to have some pink paper plates left over from Remi’s recent princess birthday party, so we were ready to go! (Only have white plates? No problem! Just hand your preschooler some crayons, markers, or paints, and let her go to town decorating the hat herself!)

I drew the pattern on the plate and let Remi cut it out herself. This was her first time using scissors on something other than plain paper, and it was challenging for her little hands, but she did the best she could and I took over to help out right at the end.

Anything to work those hand muscles is good preparation for all the writing she has ahead of her in future school grades. One of my favorite things to do with Remi is taking her to the bathroom mirror to look at her creations. I always enjoy the response!

We also did several fun, heart-themed math activities. (I got all the free printables from here, and you can, too!)

We started out with a Count-and-Sort activity. I gave her a box of candy conversation hearts…you know, the ones that taste like chalk? 😉 She arranged them by color on the sorting mat, then counted how many of each color she had. We talked about more, less, most, least, and fewest as she answered questions about each.

Next up was a Heart Graphing activity.

Remi looked at the color words at the bottom of the graph, and added the hearts where appropriate. Then we looked at the graph together and I had her compare the stacks. (Which has more—green, or purple? Do any of them the same amount?)

If your preschooler is like mine, she loves any activity involving do-a-dot markers, so why not try a game of Heart Bingo?

I wrote numerals on each heart and then gave her a die, and each time she rolled it she had to count the pips (dots on the die) and stamp that numeral. She did this over and over and over!

The mistake I made? There were eight hearts, so without thinking I numbered them one through eight. Well, as you know, there are only six sides of a die, and she quickly noticed that she was never going to get a seven or eight. She asked if she could go ahead and stamp them anyway, and I let her—after identifying each and counting aloud for me.

By the way, this is a great time to teach your child that two are DICE and one is a DIE.

While the die was out, we used it to play a Valentine’s Grid Game.

I gave her some red Unifix cubes and told her they were bear candy. The grid contained bears with hearts, and those bears were VERY hungry for some Valentine’s candy. But, the only was they could get some was for her to roll the die, count the pips, and give that number of bears one piece of “candy” each. She was very concerned about the poor, hungry bears, and worked quickly to make sure each one had a treat!

In the meantime, she was getting some good practice identifying those dot patterns…but don’t tell her that, OK?

The great thing about all these activities is that, once you get your preschooler started, she can work fairly independently if you need to teach older children, nurse a baby, etc. Just stay close enough to enjoy watching the fun she’s having!

We brought the conversation hearts back out for some Heart Patterning work.

The worksheets I used were from a set of eight pages (see link above) and contained AB, ABC, AABB, and AAB patterns. Unfortunately, our box of candy didn’t contain all the colors we needed, so we just did the ones we could and a few times I substituted for her by, for example, covering yellow hearts with green candy ones to change the pattern to something we could do with the hearts we had. And, finally, she got to eat some hearts as a reward for all her hard “work” (play) doing math! 🙂

Finally, we did a fun Valentine’s Maze. I explained to my daughter that this little man loved this little woman, and really wanted to give her some flowers for Valentine’s Day, but he was having a hard time finding her. Remi was all too happy to help him out!

I found the maze at this site, which also contains other preschool printables like dot-to-dots, as well as lots of fun activities for your older kids, too. I printed out several Valentine’s Day activities from there for my ten year old, including word searches, word scrambles, and crypto-families.

Make the most of this special day with your little one. By next Valentine’s Day, she’ll be so much more grown up!

From our family to yours, Happy Valentine’s Day.

Enjoy learning together!

 

In Genesis 11:1-9 we find the story of The Tower of Babel. It’s a story about a group of people who tried to rebel against God’s plan for them. It’s a story of how God thwarted their efforts. And it’s a great reminder for young and old alike that we need to do things God’s way, whether we understand them or not!

Remi and I had a great time learning about The Tower of Babel through fun activities and snacks. Here’s what we did; I hope you enjoy this story, too!

Bible:

Of course, the very first thing we always do is read the Bible story. It’s important to teach your little one WHY it was wrong for the people to build the tower. Way back in Genesis 1, God had said (in verse 28) to “fill the earth.” We talked about the house we recently built, and how silly it would be to have all this space but spend all our time crammed together in one room. In the same way, God had created a great big world as a home for the people he made, and He wanted them to spread out! But, they refused, and chose to do things their own way, until God took over and did it for them. (v. 8 “So the Lord scattered them abroad from there over the face of the whole earth…..”)

Movement:

As a movement activity, we played a game I made up called “Stop and Scatter.” When I called “STOP!” Remi had to freeze in one place to show how the people disobeyed God by refusing to fill the earth. When I called out “SCATTER!” she moved all around the house from one place to another to show how the people should have obeyed God . She loved this and it provided a great opportunity to contrast obedience and disobedience. (Plus, I love games that require no supplies and no advance preparation!)

"Scattering" like God said to do...

“Scattering” like God said to do…

(And no, the princess dress had nothing to do with the Bible story OR the activity. She just tends to wear them around the house and on this day her sister had made her a crown to go along with the dress.)

Math/Science:

We did a couple of fun, easy activities to reinforce the story. First, I cut some strips of construction paper in various lengths and had Remi arrange the pieces in order, from longest (on the bottom) to shortest (on the top), which created a tower shape. I printed the words of Genesis 11:4 on the bottom of a piece of paper and she glued the strips onto this background. (I got the idea here.) This was a good visual discrimination activity, as well, and squeezing glue from a bottle is great for those little hand muscles. (If your child is very young, glue sticks are a safe and easy alternative.)

Next, I did the obvious. I pulled out our big tub of wooden blocks and let her go to town building her own tower. Of course, she didn’t get to finish it, just like the people in the land of Shinar weren’t allowed to finish theirs! Remember to review the Bible story with every activity you do together. Building time is a great time for your little one to tell the story back to you!

Just for fun:

I told Remi I really needed her help. I then gave her several requests and instructions, but all were in a foreign language. (I spoke Dutch to her, but you could use any foreign language you know. And don’t worry if you aren’t bilingual. You can always speak Pig Latin!) This illustrated for her how it would have been impossible for the people to work together successfully once God confused their language.

Snack time:

For our snack we made Tower of Babel Nachos! We started with some bricks (tortilla chips) and mortar (grated cheese):

Bricks and mortar for our tower

Bricks and mortar for our tower

We used our building materials to carefully construct a big tower of yummy nachos to share with the rest of the family.

Tower of Babel Nachos

Tower of Babel Nachos

This Bible story is great for reinforcing importance concepts like obeying, trusting God’s plan, and following His instructions. Talk about these concepts with your child as you enjoy the various activities together, and please let me know how they go if you try any of my ideas with your little ones.

Enjoy learning together!