Posts Tagged ‘Bible’

This is the final post in a series of apple-themed lessons and activities. I hope you’ve enjoyed them all so far, and want to share a few more ideas today as we wrap up.

Memory work:

We memorized Psalm 17:8 (NIV):

“Keep me as the apple of Your eye; hide me in the shadow of Your wings.”

We learned this verse the first day, and said it often during our Apple Week. Be sure your child understands the meaning of this verse, and how very special she is in God’s eyes!

Craft:

Anything with paint goes over big at our house, and this craft was no exception. I simply gave Remi a paper plate and some red paint and let her go to town on it…

painting apple craft

…and then we added a letter “a” (from a template downloaded from Confessions of a Homeschooler) which I printed on white paper, to represent the apple’s flesh. We glued on some of the seeds we’d extracted from a real apple during snack time, and then I gave her some green and brown construction paper so she could make a stem and leaf. Apparently, she got them a little backwards…but how cute is that?

apple seed craft

Drawing:

With each theme we do, I have Remi draw a picture to add to her notebook. Here’s her rendition of an apple:

apple drawing

Dictation:

Next, I had my little one explain to me how to make an apple pie. As she dictated the instructions, I wrote them down on this printable from Homeschool Share. It was intended to be a mini-book that could be added to a lapbook, but I thought it was cute “as is” for her notebook, so we went with this:

Apple pie instructions

Do-a-dot:

I often throw in a do-a-dot activity with each theme, just for fun, such as this apple do-a-dot worksheet from DLTK:

A is for apple do-a-dot

Non-traditional coloring? Yes, please!

Be sure to check out the other apple posts in this series, and let me know if you used any of these ideas, or plan to.

Apple Science

Apple Bible Lesson

Apple Math

Apple Snacks

Apple Story Time

Well, that wraps up our apple theme.

Enjoy learning together!

In Genesis 11:1-9 we find the story of The Tower of Babel. It’s a story about a group of people who tried to rebel against God’s plan for them. It’s a story of how God thwarted their efforts. And it’s a great reminder for young and old alike that we need to do things God’s way, whether we understand them or not!

Remi and I had a great time learning about The Tower of Babel through fun activities and snacks. Here’s what we did; I hope you enjoy this story, too!

Bible:

Of course, the very first thing we always do is read the Bible story. It’s important to teach your little one WHY it was wrong for the people to build the tower. Way back in Genesis 1, God had said (in verse 28) to “fill the earth.” We talked about the house we recently built, and how silly it would be to have all this space but spend all our time crammed together in one room. In the same way, God had created a great big world as a home for the people he made, and He wanted them to spread out! But, they refused, and chose to do things their own way, until God took over and did it for them. (v. 8 “So the Lord scattered them abroad from there over the face of the whole earth…..”)

Movement:

As a movement activity, we played a game I made up called “Stop and Scatter.” When I called “STOP!” Remi had to freeze in one place to show how the people disobeyed God by refusing to fill the earth. When I called out “SCATTER!” she moved all around the house from one place to another to show how the people should have obeyed God . She loved this and it provided a great opportunity to contrast obedience and disobedience. (Plus, I love games that require no supplies and no advance preparation!)

"Scattering" like God said to do...

“Scattering” like God said to do…

(And no, the princess dress had nothing to do with the Bible story OR the activity. She just tends to wear them around the house and on this day her sister had made her a crown to go along with the dress.)

Math/Science:

We did a couple of fun, easy activities to reinforce the story. First, I cut some strips of construction paper in various lengths and had Remi arrange the pieces in order, from longest (on the bottom) to shortest (on the top), which created a tower shape. I printed the words of Genesis 11:4 on the bottom of a piece of paper and she glued the strips onto this background. (I got the idea here.) This was a good visual discrimination activity, as well, and squeezing glue from a bottle is great for those little hand muscles. (If your child is very young, glue sticks are a safe and easy alternative.)

Next, I did the obvious. I pulled out our big tub of wooden blocks and let her go to town building her own tower. Of course, she didn’t get to finish it, just like the people in the land of Shinar weren’t allowed to finish theirs! Remember to review the Bible story with every activity you do together. Building time is a great time for your little one to tell the story back to you!

Just for fun:

I told Remi I really needed her help. I then gave her several requests and instructions, but all were in a foreign language. (I spoke Dutch to her, but you could use any foreign language you know. And don’t worry if you aren’t bilingual. You can always speak Pig Latin!) This illustrated for her how it would have been impossible for the people to work together successfully once God confused their language.

Snack time:

For our snack we made Tower of Babel Nachos! We started with some bricks (tortilla chips) and mortar (grated cheese):

Bricks and mortar for our tower

Bricks and mortar for our tower

We used our building materials to carefully construct a big tower of yummy nachos to share with the rest of the family.

Tower of Babel Nachos

Tower of Babel Nachos

This Bible story is great for reinforcing importance concepts like obeying, trusting God’s plan, and following His instructions. Talk about these concepts with your child as you enjoy the various activities together, and please let me know how they go if you try any of my ideas with your little ones.

Enjoy learning together!

Noah’s Ark

Posted: December 3, 2012 in Bible Learning Fun
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Young children never seem to tire of hearing the story of Noah, the ark he built, and the animals God saved during the Great Flood. Following are several activities you can use to reinforce this incredible story of faith and obedience with your favorite preschooler.

When we were learning about Noah’s Ark, the first thing we did (as always) was read the story from Remi’s Bible. (It starts in Genesis 6.) Then, we crafted a paper plate ark and a few pairs of animals to go inside it. I printed the animals and cut them out ahead of time (just because I knew we’d be limited on time that day) and Remi painted the ark and rainbow, and glued the animals onto craft sticks. Here’s how her finished product looked:

(You can find the free templates here.) First, she painted the rainbow and we glued it onto a paper plate. I adapted the craft by NOT printing the lower half of the ark; I simply cut a second plate in half and let her paint it brown.

Attaching that to the other plate created a pocket, perfect for inserting the animal pairs as we talked about them boarding the ark. Remi was so proud of her creation, and told the story over and over as she played with this throughout the day—a great built-in review!

Our snack for this story? You guessed it: animal crackers!

We did some animal puzzles while we talked about the animals that were brought into the ark. Many children’s Bible story books inaccurately picture Noah out rounding up animals and dragging them back to the ark, so while we “worked” we discussed the fact that the Bible says God brought the animals to Noah. He didn’t have to hunt them down!

We also played with our Noah’s ark matching cards, and had fun giving names to the boy/girl pairs and making various animal sounds while we played.

For a movement activity, Remi pretended to be different animals boarding the ark. If I called out “kangaroo,” she would hop. If I called out “snake,” she’d slither on her belly. She crawled slowly like a turtle, lumbered like an elephant, waddled like a penguin, and more. Watching her interpretations of some animals was a riot!

Next we got out our Noah’s ark play set and worked on matching and naming all the different pairs of animals.

We ended up leaving this out all week, and she would sit down and play around with it several times a day.

There are many important character qualities you can emphasize with your child while learning about Noah: faithfulness, obedience, trust in God, being a hard worker, standing “alone” for God, and more. Our kids need good heroes, and Noah can certainly be one of them!

(I’ll add more of our Noah activities when I post about the letter N.)

Be sure to follow this lesson with one on God’s Rainbow Promise.

Enjoy learning together!